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2012 Retrospective and 2013 Resolutions

Another year goes by with more lessons learned in entrepreneurship, finance, leadership, compassion, and most of all love (for what I do and who I care for). Before I dive into the different topics, here's a quick glance at what I've been doing this year:

Travel

- Went to Edmonton for my buddy's wedding
- Went to Las Vegas for a bachelor's party
- Went to Winnipeg for my cousin's wedding

Lifestyle

- Read Good to Great
- Re-read Rework
- Re-read Mythical Man Month
- Read Game of Thrones (A Storm of Swords)
- Started singing again along with voice exercises
- Lost 20lbs

Technology

- Started building mobile applications using Titanium instead of the usual PhoneGap.
- Started writing apps for the Play framework
- Did far more test automation on client-side and server-side
- Deployed mobile services to Heroku and setup continuous deployment via Jenkins/Heroku
- Started deploying more apps on Windows Azure either C#.NET or NodeJS
- Developed several graphing solutions using RaphaelJS and D3.js and SmoothieJS
- Developed a prototype Wedding Planner iPad app which lets users do seating arrangements, as well as, handling RSVPs

Career

- Expanded my LinkedIn network to 630+ from 300 due to tons of meetups
- Launched CodeStorm, a social network to help developers connect with others in their same
- Launched two mobile apps into the Apple AppStore (iOS)
- Launched one mobile app into the Google Play Store (Android)
- Gave several talks on automation, JavaScript testing, NodeJS, Windows Azure, and more
- Helped grow the Azure meetup to 160+ members
- Joined up with Dell as a Senior Advisor in Software Development

It's amazing how much you can do in a year -- how many peoples' lives you can affect in a positive way. It's the level of the discipline that I have for my work ethic, passion, and family that really drives me to do the things I do. Without passion, I wouldn't be able to push myself so hard. That said, I am going to raise the bar for 2013. 2013 is going to be the year of all-out relentlessness. This is the time for the real Lion to come out as I've spent most of 2012 trying things and experimenting with different strategies on business and engineering, making mistakes, and connecting with the right people.

I've made tons of mistakes in 2012 -- and I've learned from them -- This is the life of an entrepreneur -- No risk, no reward. Now that the variables are in place, 2013 is where the formula starts being applied to every aspect of career, business, and family.

This is my year to shine. I'm going to make a positive impact on everyone I meet, grow stronger software engineering teams, build better products from the business, user experience, and engineering perspectives, and most of all, stay more connected with my family.

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