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CodeStorm: Answering the question of how to build stronger software engineering teams

With CodeStorm, we're always thinking about what makes software engineering teams hustle. From the tools each team member uses, to the process, to the internal and external initiatives set forth by higher level leadership.

After watching Moneyball (2011), it tells the story of how Billy Beane reconstructed his team and rethought how to build a stronger, better baseball team on a vastly lower budget than his competition. While everyone else in the Baseball industry was using archaic ways of recruiting based on experience and intuition (paying the highest for the rockstars), Billy Beane disrupted everything by recruiting on a specific metric -- On Base Percentage. The interesting thing here is that the players he recruited on his team were undervalued -- they weren't all stars -- and they were all passionate about their craft. In the end, the moral of the story is that the sum of the team is greater than each individual part put together. Moneyball was an incredibly inspirational film for me as it is something I always think about when building up CodeStorm -- how do we build better and stronger software engineering team?

Our answer is to allow teams of developers to easily login through GitHub and have our platform magically come up with big data metrics (commits, languages, technologies, tools, activity) and present teams with a wide array of analytics in the form of visualizations (venn diagrams) that can help teams become better. The idea here is that you can't improve without measuring yourself -- and in building a high performance software engineering team, there needs to be a new way of finding talent and ensuring team is constantly innovating, pushing the limits of their products, and inspiring themselves to be better.

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