Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Develop to Developer: What is Passion?

Passion is what makes someone truly great. You can see just from glancing at a developer's application that an extensive amount of passion went into his or her work. Passion is not something you can forcefully create or define but you know it when you see it. Sometimes passion is misdirected into building things that are harmful to others. Sometimes it is the determination of one that makes a creation so great. Passion makes a person a hero, it makes a villain evil, and it definitely makes a front-end developer a true Ninja.

Passion makes software memorable. Passion awakens theoretical design and entangles us in its practicality. Passion is the engine that drives inspiration and ingenuity. I often wonder how technologically advanced the human race would be if it wasn't for some of the most passionate inventors of our time: Einstein (relativity), Edison (light), Arnold Schwarzenegger (bodybuilding)? People often ask me why I'm constantly trying to find newer, effective solutions for our present day web applications (performance, best practices, theoretical/conceptual research). With a smile, I can only say that I don't do it for the money--I do it because I love doing it. Everyone that has worked with me knows it--this is who I am.

I have come far in my training. *Ninja Vanish*

Good luck and have fun,
Jaime Bueza

Jaime Bueza is a software developer in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. He has developed web applications for Nintendo, Electronic Arts, Ritchie Brothers, Kiwi Collections, and Cox Communications. When he's not developing useful software that constantly evolves with business requirements, he's creating tutorial videos for aspiring front-end developers.

IE6 Downfall Is Coming, The Nail in the Coffin for IE6

The tides of darkness are slowly subsiding. I've come from a generation of front-end developers that have had to deal with every single IE6-related layout or JS bug in the book. Incidentally, I've been looking at the latest browser statistics on W3C and although your particular client may have more IE6 users, we can't deny the fact that the IE6 unicorn is about to die off in the coming years. It is happening. The day that I thought would ever come is edging closer and closer as I look at these web browser usage statistics.

My current client has mandated that all their sites drop IE6 support. This is a client that pulls in a huge amount of traffic hits a day and anyone who visits the site on IE6 will be thrown this message: http://code.google.com/p/ie6-upgrade-warning/.

This brings me to my question: are IE6 heroes needed anymore with declining usage? Do you remember the days when a client wouldn't launch the site because of IE6 performance issues? Do you remember when your client was raging about transparencies/drop shadows not being pixel perfect? Those were the good old days of broken bones, blood, and sweat. Newer developers that are coming into the front-end development scene don't deal with these kinds of issues at present day now that clients realize how terrible IE6 is and how 5% of traffic isn't worth doubling the budget on bug fixes. Have times changed, has launching a site become easy mode?

Good luck and have fun,
Jaime Bueza

Jaime Bueza is a software developer in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. He has developed web applications for Nintendo, Electronic Arts, Ritchie Brothers, Kiwi Collections, and Cox Communications. When he's not developing useful software that constantly evolves with business requirements, he's creating tutorial videos for aspiring front-end developers.